Category Archives: featured

stem cell therapy side effects and aftercare

Stem Cell Therapy: Side Effects & Aftercare

 

Two of the biggest trending questions about stem cell therapy, aside from insurance coverage and costs, are what is the aftercare from a stem cell therapy injection and are there any side effects.

 

We’re going to answer both of these questions today.

 

Stem Cell Therapy Side Effects

The products we use are FDA regulated as a human cell and tissue product (HCT/P) and are intended for homologous (human to human) use. Fortunately, the chances of a reaction towards this treatment are immeasurably small for most individuals.

ice pack for injection site painThe only side effects that have been reported are redness and slight swelling to the injection site. These side effects usually subside within a few hours or days after the procedure.

If this happens, we urge our patients to use ice packs on the injection site and do not take ibuprofen for the swelling, as NSAIDs can hinder the results of the regenerative injection.

 

Stem Cell Therapy Aftercare

While stem cell therapy remains a minimally evasive, safe, and effective treatment protocol for osteoarthritic joints like knees, shoulders, and hips, we do ask our patients to follow a simple routine of aftercare.

 

walking for recovery stem cellsWalking – We encourage our patients to get active just by walking. Walking is one of the best full-body, low-impact exercises. Once our patients receive a regenerative therapy injection, they find great joy in indulging in this once sometimes painful activity again.

 

Joint-Specific Exercises – We provide our patients with specific exercises to help rehabilitate the joint that has received a regenerative injection. These exercises and stretches can help patients increase their range of motion in conjunction with their post-injection therapy.

 

We also suggest to our patients that they keep a journal as to how they are experiencing the changes to their joint(s) after the regenerative injection.

A few items of interest our patients have told us include:

  • Being able to walk up and down the stairs without pain
  • Walking longer distances and durations
  • Ease in getting up from a seated position
  • No stiffness in the mornings when they wake up

 

weight loss as a result of stem cells injectionsWe should also mention that one of the best side effects of regenerative stem cell therapy injections is weight loss as a result of the increased physical activity!

 

 


 

Who doesn’t want a better quality of life?

What are you waiting for?

Results are best seen with osteoarthritic joints like knees, shoulders, and hips.

Sign up today for a free no-obligation consultation to see if you are a candidate for this remarkable new treatment option.

Call us at 1-833-FOR APPT (367-2778) or fill out the form below now!

 


Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy Consult

 


independent medical exam IME

Independent Medical Examination and Workers’ Comp

What is an Independent Medical Examination and How Will It Affect My Workers’ Compensation Case?

If there is a dispute about your medical condition in your workers’ comp case, the insurance company may ask you to undergo an independent medical examination (IME) by a doctor of its choosing.

IME doctors provide reports that carry legal weight and can be used as evidence at your hearing to establish the degree of your permanent disability and how much you should receive in benefits. Because the outcome of these exams can greatly affect your workers’ comp case, it’s important to know the general purpose of these medical exams and how to prepare for them.

 

What Is an Independent Medical Examination?

An independent medical examination (IME) is a medical evaluation that is used to resolve questions about your medical condition, including what treatment is necessary and the degree of your permanent impairment if any. An IME is most often requested by the insurance company when there is a question about what treatment you need or what permanent disability rating you should be given. In some cases, the judge or hearing officer assigned to your case may also order an IME to resolve a disputed issue related to your case.

 

Who Chooses the Doctor for an IME?

An independent medical examination (IME) is supposed to be an objective assessment of your medical condition, including what treatment you need, whether you have a permanent impairment and to what degree, and your ability to work in the future. However, whether your IME is truly objective may depend, in part, on how the IME doctor is selected.

Most often, an IME is requested by the insurance company because it disagrees with your course of treatment or your permanent disability rating, as determined by your treating doctor (the one who regularly treats you for your work-related injury). If this is the case, the IME is usually performed by a doctor selected by the insurance company. These doctors are paid by the insurance companies and often rely on the insurance companies for referrals. As a result, they have an incentive to minimize the scope of your injury to lower your workers’ comp award.

In some states, you may also have the right request a medical examination when you disagree with your treating doctor’s opinions. In this situation, you can usually select the doctor who will perform the examination.

If you have been asked to undergo an IME, you should consider consulting with a workers’ comp attorney. Unless your case is simple or your injuries are minor, you may need the assistance of a lawyer if the insurance company is challenging your treating doctor’s opinions.

 

What Happens During an IME?

Before the examination occurs, your medical records and any other documents relevant to your injuries (such as your injury report or statements you’ve given in your case) will be sent to the IME doctor. The doctor will decide whether to review the documents before or after the examination. 

If there is a hotly contested issue in your case, the insurance company may write a letter to the doctor explaining your injury, summarizing your course of treatment to date, and posing specific questions about your medical condition. These questions are used to frame the issues for the doctor. For example, the doctor may be asked his or her opinion about whether your current symptoms are related to your work accident or whether a surgery recommended by your treating doctor is necessary.

You should ask to review any letter sent to the IME doctor by the insurance company. That way you can correct any factual mistakes and make sure that the questions asked are appropriate in your case. Whenever possible, you should make your request in writing and file a copy with the state agency in which your workers’ comp claim is pending.

During an IME, there is generally no expectation of a normal physician-patient relationship.

This means that anything you tell the doctor is not privileged or protected in any way. Your statements to the doctor could even be used against you at a workers’ comp hearing if your case gets that far. The same goes for observations the doctor makes. 

For example, if the doctor sees you walking normally from your car to the office, but then sees you grimacing with pain and favoring one leg in the office, he or she will make a note of that. You can bet that this inconsistency will show up in the doctor’s report, and the judge or hearing officer will take this into account when assessing your credibility.

During the examination, the doctor will likely start out by asking you about how your injury happened, what your relevant medical history is, and the course of your treatment so far. To prepare, you may want to go over your notes and review the timeline of what happened between your accident and the IME.

You should ask questions about your condition and any potential treatment options that might help. If the IME doctor will be giving you a permanent impairment rating, you should ask how the doctor will calculate the rating. You should also be sure to tell your doctor about any areas of your body that are still in pain and about any activities that you still have difficulty performing. 

Once your physical examination is done, the IME doctor will write a report and send it to all parties. You should request a copy of this report and read it carefully so that you can point out any factual mistakes in your treatment or medical history.

 

How Will the IME Affect My Workers’ Comp Case?

An IME can have a large impact on your case. IME doctors are often viewed as “experts,” and their reports may be given significant weight by workers’ comp judges and hearing officers. Because they aren’t involved in your treatment, they are also seen as more objective, although that’s often not the case. For these reasons, it can be difficult to discredit an IME doctor’s expert opinion.

However, there are some situations where it will be effective to challenge the IME report. 

For example, if the doctor’s opinion is based on incorrect information about your medical history or there is some other factual mistake, you should make that clear right away. You should write a letter to the doctor and the insurance company explaining the factual mistake and supporting it with documentation from your medical records, if possible. You should request that the doctor clarify his or her report through an addendum. In some states, you can also request a second medical examination, performed by a doctor of your own choosing.

If you dispute the statements in the IME report and cannot get the issue informally resolved, and the IME is being used against you to limit or cut off your benefits, you should consult with a workers’ compensation attorney right away.

An attorney can help protect your interests by filing objections, scheduling a deposition to question the doctor, or requesting another examination.

 

As originally posted on Nolo.com


Call 1-833-FOR APPT or fill out the form below to schedule a no-cost to you consultation for any problems or injuries that you may be suffering due to your work-related injuries.

Upon completing your initial consultation your care options will be discussed in detail so you can make an informed decision regarding your care.

It is the goal of our office to provide you (the injured worker) with the care and knowledge needed to make responsible decisions regarding your health and wellness.

 

Work Injury Consult

car accident injuries

Common Vehicle Accident Injuries

 

What are the Most Common Vehicle Accident Injuries?

A look at soft tissue injuries and other common kinds of vehicle accident injuries suffered by drivers and passengers.

 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), more than three million people are injured each year in vehicle accidents across the country. The different injuries resulting from a car accident can be as varied as the individual circumstances of each collision, but there are some types of injuries that are more common than others.

Some vehicle accident injuries may resolve within a matter of days without any medical treatment at all. More serious injuries might become permanent and result in some level of physical disability.

The type and severity of injuries suffered by drivers and passengers involved in a car accident depend on factors that include:

  • Was the person wearing a seatbelt?
  • Did the person’s car get hit from the rear, side or front?
  • Was the occupant facing straight ahead in the seat? Or was the person’s head or body turned in a certain direction?
  • Was it a low-speed collision or a high-speed crash?
  • Did the car have airbags?

There are two broad categories of vehicle accident injuries: (1) impact injuries, and (2) penetrating injuries.

Impact injuries are typically caused when part of the person’s body hits some part of the interior of the car. Often this can be a knee hitting a dashboard or the head hitting the seat rest or the side window. Penetrating injuries are typically cuts and scrapes. Shattering glass or loose objects flying inside the car on impact often cause these types of injuries.

 

Soft Tissue Injuries and Car Accidents

A soft tissue injury is damage to the body’s connective tissue, which means muscles, ligaments, and tendons. This is the most common type of injury resulting from a car accident. Soft tissue injuries can take many forms.

A “whiplash” type injury to the neck and upper back is a form of soft tissue injury. In that type of injury, the muscles and ligaments are stretched due to sudden movements imposed on the head and neck in the collision. These same mechanisms and forces can cause soft tissue injuries in other areas of the body such as the back. Car accidents often cause mid-back and low-back muscle sprains and sometimes cause more serious back injuries because of the impact force against the spine.

 

Scrapes and Cuts

In a car collision, any loose objects inside the car immediately become projectiles thrown about the car’s interior. This includes cell phones, coffee mugs, eyeglasses, purses, books, dash-mounted GPS systems, etc. If any of these items hit your body, they can easily cut your skin or cause other injuries.

Sometimes these scrapes and cuts are relatively minor and require no medical treatment. More serious injuries can result in loss of blood and may require stitches.

Cuts or scrapes can also result if your airbag deploys in the collision.

 

Head Injuries and Car Accidents

Head injuries can take a number of forms, some relatively minor and others quite severe. A car’s unexpected stop or change in direction often causes the heads of the car occupants to experience sudden and unnatural movements. This can cause muscle strains in the neck and back (as discussed above). But the head itself can also be injured. Impact with a side window or steering wheel can cause scrapes and bruising to the head, or even deeper lacerations. More severe collision impacts can cause a closed head injury. In that situation, the fluid and tissue inside the skull are damaged because of the sudden movement or impact of the head. Less severe closed head injuries often result in concussions, while the most severe impacts can cause brain damage.

 

Chest Injuries

Chest injuries are also common vehicle accident injuries. These injuries typically take the form of contusions or bruises but can be more severe, such as broken ribs or internal injuries. Drivers often experience chest injuries because of their position behind the steering wheel, which allows very little freedom of movement before the chest collides with the steering wheel. If a person’s body is thrown forward in a collision, even though it might not impact the steering wheel or dashboard, the chest area will still experience a high level of force against the shoulder harness or seatbelt, which can cause severe bruising.

 

Arm and Leg Injuries

The same forces that unexpectedly throw a person’s head about in car collisions act similarly on arms and legs. If your car suffers a side impact, your arms and legs might be thrown hard against the door. While positioned as a passenger in a car, your legs typically have very little room for movement. Car accidents often cause an occupant’s knees to hit the dashboard or seats in front of them. Depending on the nature of the collision, injuries to your arms and legs might be mere bruises or scrapes, but sprains and even breaks can occur.

Keep in mind that some injuries are not readily apparent following a car accident. Depending on the nature of the injury, it may take days, weeks, or even months for symptoms to appear. So if you are in a car accident, it is best to seek medical treatment for even the slightest discomfort or early indication of injury.

 

Article originally from NOLO.com


 

If you or someone you know was injured in a recent car accident, we welcome you to contact us to see your treatment options. Convenient locations on the East and West sides of Cleveland, also in Akron, Canton, and Elyria.

1-833-FOR APPT

 

Car Accident Injury Consult